Another former Christian rocker defects to non-theism

Read this story:

https://nypost.com/2020/05/27/christian-rocker-jonathan-steingard-no-longer-believes-in-god/

Christian rocker Jonathan Steingard reveals he no longer believes in God

The frontman of a leading Christian rock band has admitted he no longer believes in God.

“After growing up in a Christian home, being a pastor’s kid, playing and singing in a Christian band, and having the word ‘Christian’ in front of most of the things in my life — I am now finding that I no longer believe in God,” Hawk Nelson frontman Jonathan Steingard wrote in a nine-page confessional on Instagram.

The 36-year-old Canadian rocker admitted that losing his religion occurred over several years of serious doubts — even while penning some of the band’s most overtly Christian tunes.

He said he was only now ready to “share my deepest truth” because Hawk Nelson “isn’t playing shows or making new music at the moment” and he no longer needs the band to support his family.

 

He said he was only now ready to “share my deepest truth” because Hawk Nelson “isn’t playing shows or making new music at the moment” and he no longer needs the band to support his family.

While he did not say outright that he was leaving the band, he made it clear he was leaving the religious rock movement.

“I no longer fear losing my place in Christian music. I know this means giving it up voluntarily,” he said in the lengthy confessional.

Steingard says he had long felt “uncomfortable” with parts of worship that “felt like some kind of weird performance art.”

But his “belief in God truly began to unravel” when he started challenging different versions of Bible stories, he said. “Once I found that I didn’t believe the Bible was the Perfect Word of God — it didn’t take long to realize that I was no longer sure he was there at all,” he wrote.

That realization left him in a “very dark place for a while” as he feared being shunned by his family and friends.

 

“I feel like I’ve mostly emerged from that dark place now — because I’ve discovered that life really does go on,” he said. “My family is showing me incredible love and support, even though I know this grieves them.”

He admitted being “terrified to post this” — and insisted he was “not looking for a debate.”

“Just a chance to share my story in the hopes some good can come from it. I love you all,” he wrote.

Hawk Nelson told People that “God is still for Jon and he still matters,” saying, “that truth doesn’t change just because we question it.”

“We are called to love one another unconditionally, as God loves us,” Daniel Biro, Micah Kuiper and David Niacaris said in a statement.

“Ever thankful and grateful for how God has used this band, the music and the relationships and how he continues to do so.”

It is clear that he was a Christian only because he was raised in it, and his being the son of a clergyman must have made him think he needed to measure up to his father’s example. But if his spiritual orientation was not Christian, that was a futile effort.

Once I found that I didn’t believe the Bible was the Perfect Word of God — it didn’t take long to realize that I was no longer sure he was there at all

That’s quite a leap from Christian fundamentalism to agnosticism, though I myself made that leap at age 20. But it should have been obvious from Day One that the Bible wasn’t perfect. Didn’t he ever read it before?

https://dalehusband.com/category/religion/bible/

He can still be a Christian and not be a delusional extremist, as I tried to explain here:

If your Spiritual Orientation is CHRISTIAN….

But if he really wants to defect, he can still find a spiritual home here:

https://cuc.ca/

He’s going to have a tough time finding a new purpose for himself, but at least he can get support here:

https://www.reddit.com/r/exchristian/

And even talk to other Christian rockers that have also defected as mentioned here:

Rewriting a bigoted article about religion

 

 

 

Another Baha’i proves a mere annoyance on YouTube

Watch this video:

Naturally, Baha’is rushed to attack it and critics of the Baha’i Faith also showed up to deal with it, including me.

As a former Baha’i I have been writing against it for many years and even made a few videos about it. Here are links to them:
How should Unitarian Universalists Deal with Baha’is?:
Five Ways to Create a Religion of Hypocrites
The Fatal Flaw of Baha’i Authority: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02FWnoAP3tk
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When researching the Bahá’í Faith, please do not limit yourself only to the officially-sanctioned literature of the Bahá’í Administrative Order. Here are a few observations…
1) The Bahá’í Faith exists solely to perpetuate itself, 99% of its focus and activities are toward this one goal, growth in membership. Throughout their history they have been preparing their members for the “entry by troops” of new converts, which has yet to materialize. They do a minimal amount of humanitarian or charity work.
2) Bahá’ís use terminology in ways that was not intended. Bahá’ís don’t have censorship, they have “review.” They don’t proselytize, they “teach.” They don’t have missionaries, they have “pioneers.” They don’t have prophets, they are called “manifestations.” And so forth.
3) Bahá’ís have a “lo is us” sense of historical persecution. If you look at their history, though, most would call it just fruits. During the founding of the religion, the forebear Babi sect led a violent, apocalyptic revolution in Iran, and some of their members later attempted to assassinate the Shah. Their leadership were exiled to the Ottoman Empire where schismatic violence within the group later led to house arrest. Of course, this is all billed as being persecuted.
4) Bahá’ís lament how others view them in a conspiratorial light, when in fact, again, this is based on historical reality. In Iran the Babis had the protection of the Russian ambassador (Russia being an imperial power that had seized wide swaths of territory from Iran and at one point the Russian ambassador had to approve Iranian cabinet ministers). In the Ottoman Empire, Bahá’ís conspired with the Young Turks, who deposed Sultan Abdul Hamid II in a coup. Later, they would assist the British, and their leader `Abdu’l-Bahá earned knighthood, being designated KBE. With their headquarters in Haifa, Bahá’ís have cooperated with the state of Israel, to the extent that some of the Bahá’í World Center buildings are built on land expropriated from absentee Palestinian land owners.
5) Bahá’ís inflate their membership numbers. Comparing census data of various nations to self-reported data confirms this. The outside data Bahá’ís often cite, like from the Association of Religion Data Archives, only uses self-reported data, creating a circle.
6) In the community I was a member of, even in the lifetime of Khomeini, there were Persian Bahá’ís who would regularly travel to Iran during their summer holidays to visit family. When I would ask them how that was possible, their response was always along the lines that the arrested Bahá’ís were those who were administratively and politically active, almost to the point of referring to them as “troublemakers.” The Bahá’í Administrative Order uses these news stories of alleged persecution very astutely to generate media attention. A Google News search for the term “Bahá’í” shows a predominance of news stories regarding Bahá’í temples and discrimination. Otherwise, the Bahá’í Faith generates little to no interest.
7) Bahá’ís initially hide from members some of the more unsavory realities of their religion. Men and women are equal, but women are barred from serving in the highest organ of the religion, the Universal House of Justice, and will presumably be barred from the local and national Houses of Justice that the current LSA’s and NSA’s will one day evolve into. The hierarchy is billed as being democratic, but only in the sense of council democracy as it still exists in Cuba where individuals elect local committees, who then elect national committees, who then elect the Universal House of Justice. There is a parallel appointed hierarchy. With no politicking or partisanship allowed, elected members in the higher ranks serve for life until they die or retire, and are subsequently replaced by nomenklatura.
8) Bahá’ís hide from members some of the more unsavory realities of their history. After Bahá’u’lláh their leader was ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and then Shoghi Effendi. By the time Shoghi Effendi died, all the living descendants of Bahá’u’lláh had been excommunicated from the religion for various offenses, including marrying a “lowborn Christian girl,” a term he would later defend. Shoghi Effendi was also designated the “Guardian,” by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá. The Guardian was supposed to designated subsequent Guardians, but did not do so, although the entire Bahá’í administrative structure depended on it.
9) Ignoring failed prophecies, like `Abdu’l-Bahá declaring the peace of the world to come by the year 2000. Those of us around in the 1980’s and 1990’s remember the crescendo, and the anticlimactic ignoring of reality and denial of the build up.
10) Many Bahá’ís books have been posthumously rewritten to remove references to to failed prophecies and prominent individuals who left the Bahá’í Faith for various reasons. These rewrites are more than minor edits and constitute a different process than “Bahá’í review” which the euphemism used for pre-publication censorship.
11) Bahá’ís claim earlier religions are valid, but in reality they only do this in an Islamic sense (i.e., the earlier revelation was perverted over time). For example, they deny the parts of Bible written by Paul. Or when Muhammad says he is the last prophet, Bahá’ís say that was true only for the Adamic Cycle, but now we are in the Bahá’í Cycle.
12) The Universal House of Justice has noted that only “A fraction of the total numbers of unique works have been published in the original languages or translated into Western languages.” The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, the central book of the Bahá’í Faith written by Bahá’u’lláh, was only officially translated into English in 1992, by which time other translations, such as one by the Royal Asiatic Society, were becoming increasingly available through dissemination via the internet. My personal opinion is that the material in the Kitáb-i-Aqdas is so objectionable that the Bahá’í authorities wished to shield Western believers from its contents, as they do from Bahá’u’lláh’s other works by not publishing the originals or providing translations.
I could go on. If you’re wondering why I am sending you this message, it is because of my personal experience with the Baha’i Faith. If years ago I knew what I know now, I would have avoided years of commitment and devotion, not to mention financial contribution, to a religion that was presented inaccurately. In the final analysis, I do not believe the Baha’i Faith to be true. For over ten years I did “leave it alone.” But a couple of years ago I went on Wikipedia, just to browse, and sure enough the same canards and lies were being repeated. I had never been to Reddit before, but a Google search on a topic brought me here and, sure enough, the same material was being presented. That motivated me to “set the record straight.” At some point, I felt like I needed to call people on their bullshit. My only intention is to present an unbiased truth as documented in the historical record, most of it from Baha’i sources no less.
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As a Baha’i myself, every one of the explanations you gave have errors in them. Also, if you’re not a Baha’i anymore why is it that your profile image is the Baha’i symbol (nine pointed star)?
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@Tufan 19 This symbol is not the Trademark of the Baha’i Administration. Only the “Most Great Name” is. On August 28,1934, the Most Great Name symbol was registered as a trademark (Trade-Mark 316,444). Similarly, the “Bahá’í” trademark (Trade-Mark 245,271) was registered with the Patent Office on August 7, 1928. These trademarks have not prevented the use of the term “Bahá’í” by groups considered Covenant-breakers by the Bahá’í Administrative Order, as upheld in repeated failed litigation. As early as 1941, the New York Supreme Court dismissed a court case brought by National Spiritual Assembly and Trustees of the Bahá’ís of the United States and Canada against Mirza Ahmad Sohrab for the use of the word “Bahá’í.” The judge granted a motion to dismiss, stating that “the plaintiffs have no right to a monopoly of the name of a religion. The defendants, who purport to be members of the same religion, have an equal right to use the name of the religion…”
_________________
What are the errors?
_______________
@Anonymous 35821361 Why should I waste my time right now and explain them to you. It’s so easy to just copy and paste misinformation.
_____________________
@Tufan 19 That’s a cop out! If you can’t directly answer those charges above, why should anyone take the Baha’i Faith seriously?
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@Dale Husband It’s easy for me to answer these “few observations”. In fact, I addressed one of them to some one else here. Yet, it seems too hard for him to answer as to why choose a Baha’i star as a profile pic. Why choose to confuse people as to your real motive. That’s why I refuse to waste my time any more with this thread.
_________________
Goodbye and good riddance.
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What a wuss! Anyway, here’s another video from that same channel:
I wish Baha’is, Christians, Republicans and others would just stop with the propaganda tactics and just tell the TRUTH!

She could have been my daughter!

Read this online obituary:

https://www.dignitymemorial.com/obituaries/franklin-oh/sarah-grossman-9203495

Sarah Rae Grossman

October 7, 1997 – May 30, 2020
Obituary of Sarah Rae Grossman

With great sadness we announce the death of Sarah Rae Grossman, age 22, of Columbus, Oh (formerly of Springboro, Oh) on May 30, 2020. Born October 7, 1997 in Naperville, Il, Sarah is survived by her parents, Todd and Christi Grossman, and sister Jessa Grossman, of Springboro Oh; Grandparents Lonnie and Thelma Mullins, Mel and Shelley Grossman, and Phillip and Sue VanKersen, and many loving and amazing friends, aunts, uncles and cousins. She was a 2016 graduate of Springboro High School.

Sarah graduated May 3, 2020 from The Ohio State University with an Honors Degree of Bachelor of Science in the School of Environment and Natural Resources. Her specific course of study within the EEDS program (Environment, Economy, Development and Sustainability) reflected her life passions. Prior to the Covid pandemic, Sarah planned to complete a second degree in Spanish in 2021 while attending the Universidad of Belgrano in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

It is impossible to find the words to describe her kindness, unique spirit, and unwavering dedication to her convictions. Sarah was a fierce but compassionate supporter of environmental issues and social justice. A genuine friend who loved and cherished her extraordinary friendships. She was the most caring and thoughtful daughter, a beloved granddaughter, and a loving sibling and best friend to her sister Jessa.

Sarah had spent the past two summers in Guatemala researching the harvesting industry. After graduation she planned to pursue work promoting positive environmental, climate and land use policies, assisting migrant workers and indigenous communities. She wanted to help the voices of the underserved be heard. She opened our eyes to both lovely ideas and ugly truths. In addition to being a full time student, she was a hard working employee, having held over six jobs in her short life, most recently at Stauf’s Coffee, and Chadwick Arboretum in Columbus, Oh. Sarah loved nature and being outdoors- hiking in the great National Parks of this country, collecting and caring for plants, watching the sun set and the moon rise. She had many interests that brought her joy- creating ceramics and art, finding that awesome thrift store find, and she definitely loved her coffee! She had visited nine countries- always wanting to learn about the world through the eyes of another. She lived a short but full life.

We will forever miss those big dimples and sweet smile. Those who knew her will understand what a beautiful soul the world has lost.

And how did she die? According to posts on Twitter:

Wow. I know some people on Twitter are still in denial about this:

Erin Stalcup
@stalcup_erin4
Replying to

Hey, this claim is currently unsubstantiated. As such, her family is asking that tweets like these be taken down until such time as they can prove them and are ready for all of the negative attention that has come upon them.
2:27 PM · Jun 5, 2020
________________
eclair
@canuclairify

Replying to

Hello! Please take this post down immediately out of respect for Sarah’s close friends and family. There is no conclusion as to how she has passed and spreading misinformation is incredibly harmful.
_____________
But I’m sure it’s only because she was a white woman and some people still can’t get their heads around the idea that ANYONE can be a victim of police brutality or racism in general!
Well, think again!

Viola Fauver Liuzzo (née Gregg; April 11, 1925 – March 25, 1965) was a housewife and mother of five. In March 1965, Liuzzo heeded the call of Martin Luther King Jr and traveled from Detroit, Michigan, to Selma, Alabama, in the wake of the Bloody Sunday attempt at marching across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Liuzzo participated in the successful Selma to Montgomery marches and helped with coordination and logistics. At the age of 39, while driving back from a trip shuttling fellow activists to the Montgomery airport, she was murdered by members of the Ku Klux Klan.

One of the four Klansmen in the car from which the shots were fired was Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) informant Gary Thomas Rowe.[1][2] Rowe testified against the shooters and was given witness protection by the FBI.[3] The FBI immediately began a smear campaign and leaked to the press what were purported to be salacious details about Liuzzo. The FBI attempted to downplay the situation and to discredit Liuzzo by spreading rumors that she was a member of the Communist Party, was a heroin addict,[4] and had abandoned her children to have sexual relationships with African-Americans involved in the Civil Rights Movement.[5] All of the rumors were entirely false and were wholely fabricated by the FBI.[6][7]

THAT woman could have been my mother or grandmother!

If it turns out that Sarah Grossman did not die because of tear gas, we should correct the misinformation. But she is worth remembering anyway. So is anyone who takes a stand (or drops to a knee, for that matter) to protest injustice.

16142334_10211338387960087_7371942984170139432_n

Police misconduct is not just about killing black people.

With all the protests erupting across America regarding the murder of an unarmed black man, George Floyd, at the hands (and knee) of a white cop, I am reminded of an incident that illustrated to me why police can’t always be trusted, even if they don’t kill blacks at all.

Back when I was living in Arlington, Texas, I was traveling down highway 360 when I was pulled over by a cop. He approached my car and said, “Do you know why I pulled you over?”
I said, “No clue, officer. I know I wasn’t speeding. In fact, it is impossible to speed on this highway; it’s too congested.”
The cop then said, “Are you lost? Do you need help getting somewhere?”
I said, “No, I’m fine.”
The cop let me go. But I have no doubt that he did so only because of my white privilege. But I was driving a 2002 Saturn that was in such poor condition that I’m sure the cop seeing it from a distance assumed it was being driven by a poor black or hispanic man. So if instead I had been a person of color, he likely would have written me a ticket for some made up excuse and I would have had to go to court to fight it and still risk losing the fight in front of a mostly white jury. I already knew that traffic tickets are a convenient means of a city to raise extra money without raising taxes on most citizens, not merely a matter of public safety. And what better way to keep minorities down than by targeting their pocketbooks?

I have been distrustful of police ever since.

Pixelberry Studios, the Choices app, and Perfect Match.

In 2018, I downloaded and began playing an app on my new smartphone titled Choices: Stories You Play created by a mobile gaming company called Pixelberry Studios. It features stories of romance that you have some control over by making decisions on behalf of the stories’ Main Characters. The characters include teenagers in high school, young adults in college, older adults dealing with mysteries and fighting criminals and other powerful enemies, and even some historical scenarios.

https://choices-stories-you-play.fandom.com/wiki/Choices:_Stories_You_Play_Wikia

Of all the stories I have played so far, my favorite by far has been Perfect Match.

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